Launcelot finds Guenever easily; she hasn’t been living as an incognito nun, just as a nun.  He strides into her cloister, and when she sees him she faints!

The nuns with Guenever help her back up.

“Oh, thanks,” she says.  “It’s just, that’s…”

She sees Launcelot, where he stands in the doorway, dramatically backlit by the daylight outside.  And she faints a second time.

The nuns help her up, again.

“Whew,” she says.  “It’s just, I haven’t seen him for…”  And swoon!  Down she goes for the third time.

All the nuns wave Launcelot out of the cloister, before they help Guenever up.  “What the heck?” they ask.

“That’s Sir Launcelot, my beloved knight and lover for many decades.  Oh, the things we’ve done to one another’s bodies… Bring him over to me.”

The nuns squint.  “Are you serious?”

“Yes!”  Guenever sits down and looks as regal as she can, which is pretty darn regal.  “Bring him in.”

So the nuns lead Launcelot into Guenever’s presence.  “Through this man and me hath all this war been wrought, and the death of the most noblest knights of the world; for through our love that we have loved together is my most noble lord slain,” she tells the nuns.

“Guenever…” he begins.

“It’s good to see you,” Guenever says, stiffly.  “As you can see I’ve become a nun, in hopes of making up for the sins of the past.”

“She’s really good at it!” pipes up one of the nuns in the back.

“Thanks, Shirley.”  Guenever smiles at Shirley, then turns back to Launcelot.  “As such, I need you to leave and never come back.”

“Aw!”  Launcelot half-expected this, but still he’s crestfallen.  “Are you sure you don’t want to go back to Benwick with me and be my queen?”

“Very sure.  I’m extremely focused on my nunning career now.  Go marry someone else.  Find a girl named Elaine, I know you like them.”

“All the Elaines I knew are dead, and besides, you’re the only one I want!”

“I’m sorry, Launcelot.  It can’t happen.  Otherwise our tragic star-crossed love story would have a happy ending, and thus lose all drama and angst.  Marry someone else.”

“If I can’t marry you, I don’t want anyone.  I’ll live the rest of my life celibate!”

“Hah!”  Guenever does not think highly of Launcelot’s ability to remain celibate.  “First girl named Elaine who throws herself at you…”

“Guen, I was celibate throughout the Grail quest.  I can do it, if I need to, and proving my love for you to God or whatever… I’m going off to be a monk, if you’re going to be a nun.”

“Then I guess we’ll meet in heaven!  Peace be with you!”

“And also with you!”  Launcelot stands there for a moment.  “One last kiss?”

Nay, that I shall never do!”

Launcelot wanders off.  He searches for a spiritual advisor to help him; basically he’s looking for Nacien.  But the Grail quest is over and Nacien’s gone!  Instead Launcelot stumbles into the hermitage where the Archbishop of Canterbury and Bedivere dwell.  Bedivere recognizes Launcelot immediately, and welcomes and praises him.  When Launcelot has heard all of Bedivere’s story, he decides to stay there, in the hermitage.

Meanwhile Launcelot’s coterie of knights ride across England, searching for Launcelot.  He told them to go back to Benwick without him, but not all of them were willing to just give up on him like that.  Sir Lionel searches for him in London, and ends up starting a small war there and dying, whoopsy.

But Sir Bors finds Launcelot one morning, at the hermitage, and ends up joining them.  So too does, eventually, Sir Blamore and a half-dozen more of Launcelot’s close associates.   Sir Launcelot, Sir Bors, Sir Blamore, and Sir Bleoberis!  Also Sir Galihud, Sir Galihodin, Sir Gahalantine, Sir Villiars, and Sir Clarras! They’re all hermit-monks together, with Sir Bedivere and the Archbishop of Canterbury!  It’s like one of those 1960s sitcoms with eleven men and zero women.

Knights of the Round Table who have died: a list I surely won’t have to update as we go on from here!

Sir Balin, slain by Sir Balan in Book II.*

Sir Balan, slain by Sir Balin in Book II.*

Sir Accolon, slain by King Arthur as a result of Morgan’s plan failing in Book IV.*

King Pellinore, slain offscreen by Sir Gawaine sometime after the start of Book IV.

Sir Chestaline, Sir Gawaine’s youthful ward, slain by Roman soldiers during Book V.*

Sir Marhaus, slain by Sir Tristram early in Book VIII.

Sir Lamorak, slain offscreen by Sir Gawaine and his brothers around the time of Book X.

Sir Uwaine, slain by Sir Gawaine in Book XVI.

Sir Colgrevance, slain by Sir Lionel in Book XVI.

King Bagdemagus, slain by Sir Gawaine sometime prior to Book XVII.

Sir Galahad, ascended into heaven with the Grail in Book XVII.

Sir Percivale, died of grief after coming in second on the Grail-Quest, in Book XVII.

Sir Patrice, ate a poisoned apple intended for Sir Gawaine, in Book XVIII.

Sir Meliagrance, decapitated by Launcelot with one hand tied behind his back, in Book XIX.

Sir Tristram, murdered by King Mark sometime before Book XX.

Sir Colgrevance, again, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Agravaine, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Mador de la Porte, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Meliot de Logris, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Petipase of Winchelsea, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Galleron of Galway, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Melion of the Mountain, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Astamore, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Grummore Grummursun, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Curselaine, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Florence, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Lovel, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Gingalin, slain trying to arrest Launcelot, in Book XX.

Sir Gaheris, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Gareth, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Belliance, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Segwarides, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Griftlet the Caterer, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Brandiles, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Aglovale, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Tor, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Gauter, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Gillimer, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Reynolds, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Damas, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Priamus, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir “the Other Kay” Kay, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Driant, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Lambegus, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Herminde, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

The Green Knight, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

The Red Knight, slain by Launcelot during his rescue of Guenever, in Book XX.

Sir Gawaine, died of injuries after retaking Dover from Mordred, in Book XXI.

Sir Mordred, slain by King Arthur in the final battle, in Book XXI.

King Arthur, traveled to Avalon, in Book XXI.

Sir Lucan, died of injuries sustained in the final battle, in Book XXI.

Sir Lionel, slain in battle in London for some reason, in Book XXI.

Starred entries are knights who were not, technically, members of the Round Table, but who were more or less solid Camelot-allies.


Comments

Primary Sources: Le Morte D’Arthur, Book XXI Chapters 9 and 10 — No Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *