Primary Sources: Le Morte D’Arthur, Book VIII Chapters 26 and 27

Long story short, Tristram and Breunor fight, and Tristram wins.  Eventually Breunor loses his head, which is to say, he tries to surrender and while he is, in Malory’s words, grovelling, Tristram decapitates him.  Sir Tristram: kind of bloodthirsty! Afterwards … Continue reading →

Primary Sources: Le Morte D’Arthur Book VIII Chapter 24

Once the partying and charm offensive die down, everyone pretty much assumes that Sir Tristram and the lovely Isoud will be wed.  Certainly it’s what Queen Isoud and King Anguish expect.  But Tristram keeps failing to ask for her hand, … Continue reading →

Primary Sources: Le Morte D’Arthur Book VIII Chapters 22 and 23

As promised, Sir Tristram fights with Sir Bleoberis!  Actually, no, Tristram fights with Sir Bleoberis’s champion, his brother Sir Blamore.  I don’t know why they make that switch at the last minute.  Highlights of this joust include King Anguish pointing … Continue reading →

Primary Sources: Le Morte D’Arthur Book VIII Chapter 21

Meanwhile again, while we’re just talking about the random stuff that Tristram does, he’s outside his tent (which he’s still got pitched outside Camelot) chillaxing when a lady wanders by, sobbing. Tristram asks her why she’s sobbing, and if she … Continue reading →

Primary Sources: Le Morte D’Arthur, Book VIII Chapter 20

Meanwhile, back in the plot, stuff is afoot.  You remember Sir Bleoberis?  He has a brother, Sir Blamore.  Malory mentioned this before.  What he didn’t mention before:  these two cooked up a scheme to humiliate King Anguish of Ireland.  Their … Continue reading →

Primary Sources: Le Morte D’Arthur, Book VIII Chapters 17 and 18

So Tristram and Bleoberis meet, and they have a conversation that goes more or less like this.   “Surrender Sally!” shouts Tristram.   But Bleoberis replies with a snort.  “No!  What are you, Cornish?  I don’t abide uppity Cornish knights.” … Continue reading →

Primary Sources: Le Morte D’Arthur, Book VIII Chapter 16

Cut to: Tristram looking down on two likely knights, is how Malory phrases it.  He’s caught up to the troublemakers, Sir Lusty and Sir Thug.  He gears up to give them what-for!   Gouvernail, Tristram’s valet/Latin tutor/squire, frets. “Sir, sir, … Continue reading →